Application of Vore in Warfare

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Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby SnaxiTums » Fri May 13, 2022 5:21 pm

Hello all. For the past couple of days I’ve been wondering how warfare would be impacted by people having the ability to ‘vore’ one another. Personally I have a few ideas on how it could go down. I’ve divided my ideas into several parts in order of how I think it would progress. For the purpose of this exercise, this would be a fantasy world with different races of varying sizes. Everyone has the innate ability to carry out vore related actions but must train it in order to use it effectively. Difference in size would also have an impact on your ability (eg. an elf would have a harder time eating an orc, but a human could swallow a pixie fairly easily).

I think the first stage of warfare would be tribal war bands. In this case, tribes both would send out parties to raid other tribes and villages. This may include centaurs ravaging early subsistence farmers, eating their fill before leaving. These would probably only have upwards of a couple dozen warriors (although ‘hunter’ might be a more fitting term). Size would be particularly important, particularly when facing off against another rival band, as the bigger you are the less you’re bogged down by prey; the last thing you want is to immobilise yourself eating 5 humans only to be gobbled up by a giant 3 times your size.

The second stage would come after agriculture, although it’s debatable if it’d even occur in this scenario. I can see basic organised armies consisting of ‘skirmishers’ who could pick off prey and retreat, ‘tanks’ who’re slower but can eat more and deal a final blow to an army in a battle, and ‘ambushers’ who’d form the standard shield walls and slingers, and who can ambush larger enemies with conventional weapons. These roles probably wouldn’t be well defined and different soldiers might take up multiple roles.

The third stage would be larger armies with specialised forces. A general could probably make use of larger races like orcs, giants, or other large being to take out dozens of enemy soldiers. These would be akin to war elephants, but would be limited due to size, mobility, and upkeep. Small races like goblins could be used as distractions; the enemy is distracted eating them and is too full and sluggish to respond effectively. Perhaps the goblin’s clothes could be poisoned. Emetics could be used to great effect.

I think by the third stage, there’s not a lot of room to expand on vore-based warfare beyond ever increasing specialisation; giant predators would decide the outcome of every battle, with the only effective means to deal with them being to lather your own men in poison and march them to certain doom. There’s one glaring problem with it though: eating your enemies alive isn’t an effective way to win battles. Any attempts to properly expand on and improve warfare in this world would just lead to conventional wars (with vore likely being left for punitive means such as torture or execution).

Nevertheless it’s fun to think about and it gets the creative juices flowing. I’m excited to hear what anybody else thinks about this.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby zarpaulus » Fri May 13, 2022 9:07 pm

I've periodically thought of vore feudalism in which the knights and lords would occasionally eat a few of their serfs.

Given knights and other heavy cavalry of noble birth were somewhat equivalent to tanks in medieval warfare you could incorporate that into the "stage two" of your progression.

I've also thought about the prospect of "dragonocracy" a few times.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby Randomdude5 » Fri May 13, 2022 10:12 pm

I am going to assume same-size vore is possible in your hypothetical scenario. I think it would be difficult to get different races to work together, without conquering them, or something, so I will ignore that. Eating someone would be difficult, meaning it would be suicidal to try it against an armed, aware opponent. I think vore would happen in war as warcrimes. Soldiers would raid villages to get food. Prisoners of war would be eaten. And of course it would happen during the sack of a city. I don't know about others, but my vore kink needs the prey to be alive to be sexy. If we are talking about vore being something more normal in a setting, then I don't think there would be any reason to eat living prey. Therefore, after a battle, I think the winners would gorge themselves on the fallen. Just my opinions.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby SnaxiTums » Sat May 14, 2022 9:09 am

zarpaulus wrote:I've periodically thought of vore feudalism in which the knights and lords would occasionally eat a few of their serfs.

Given knights and other heavy cavalry of noble birth were somewhat equivalent to tanks in medieval warfare you could incorporate that into the "stage two" of your progression.

I've also thought about the prospect of "dragonocracy" a few times.

I suppose knights and other members of the nobility would suit that role well. Particularly if they’re bred and trained for their ability to eat prey.

Also I love the idea that you’ve presented of a dracocracy; having a dragon-ruled society like that would make for some very interesting scenarios. I assume there’d be a lot of predation from the draconic elites. Perhaps there’s different types of dragons depending on what class, ranging from large and imposing full dragons to middling humanoid ones.

Randomdude5 wrote:I am going to assume same-size vore is possible in your hypothetical scenario. I think it would be difficult to get different races to work together, without conquering them, or something, so I will ignore that. Eating someone would be difficult, meaning it would be suicidal to try it against an armed, aware opponent. I think vore would happen in war as warcrimes. Soldiers would raid villages to get food. Prisoners of war would be eaten. And of course it would happen during the sack of a city. I don't know about others, but my vore kink needs the prey to be alive to be sexy. If we are talking about vore being something more normal in a setting, then I don't think there would be any reason to eat living prey. Therefore, after a battle, I think the winners would gorge themselves on the fallen. Just my opinions.

I agree it’d definitely be stupid to try and eat a fully armed opponent, so definitely something to save for after they’re disarmed or otherwise disable. I can definitely see vore being used as something akin to a war crime, having your soldiers absolutely ravage a city or group of prisoners. Hell, even using it on your own soldiers by replacing the Roman decimation with a feast; lose half your manpower but feed your entire army.

I hadn’t even thought of cleaning up fallen soldiers that way, but yeah a hungry exhausted warrior isn’t just going to say no to free and plentiful food. It might be sexier to have live prey, but it is far more practical.


Thank you for your responses so far everyone! :D
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby Rejnka » Sat May 14, 2022 12:05 pm

Medieval combat between armored opponents often ended with a downed opponent being stabbed in a weak spot with a dagger to finish them off. It wouldn't be hard to replace that with eating your oppponent, barring the need for flexible armor materials to enable it. (If animal preds exist, perhaps something made of their leather could go over the stomach area? Like a vornier version of Monster Hunter.) That, and the fact that you'll be stuck with a helmet that seems more like something out of WWI than something that can block a sword - or, at the very least, somethat that leaves your moths and plenty of flexibility open, which the helmets that tended to go with plate armor did not.

I'm actually going to go out on a limb here and say that vore does not bode well for gunpowder-centric warfare. The necessary strength (and, for same-size, flexibility) will make bullets less effective, whereas melee weapons and bows will easily scale up to match stronger flesh and thicker armor. Keep in mind that medieval plate armor was only around 20 kilograms, whereas an average woman is around 62 kilograms. A big vore belly is also a lot less well-balanced than plate armor, and yet rarely seems to encumber its user much. Bomb disposal suits are around 80+ kg, making them miserable to wear into combat, but a pred could easily manage suits like that and melee weapons that can do damage through them, and probably still have lifting strength to spare on a prey.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby SnaxiTums » Sat May 14, 2022 6:25 pm

Rejnka wrote:Medieval combat between armored opponents often ended with a downed opponent being stabbed in a weak spot with a dagger to finish them off. It wouldn't be hard to replace that with eating your oppponent, barring the need for flexible armor materials to enable it. (If animal preds exist, perhaps something made of their leather could go over the stomach area? Like a vornier version of Monster Hunter.) That, and the fact that you'll be stuck with a helmet that seems more like something out of WWI than something that can block a sword - or, at the very least, somethat that leaves your moths and plenty of flexibility open, which the helmets that tended to go with plate armor did not.

I'm actually going to go out on a limb here and say that vore does not bode well for gunpowder-centric warfare. The necessary strength (and, for same-size, flexibility) will make bullets less effective, whereas melee weapons and bows will easily scale up to match stronger flesh and thicker armor. Keep in mind that medieval plate armor was only around 20 kilograms, whereas an average woman is around 62 kilograms. A big vore belly is also a lot less well-balanced than plate armor, and yet rarely seems to encumber its user much. Bomb disposal suits are around 80+ kg, making them miserable to wear into combat, but a pred could easily manage suits like that and melee weapons that can do damage through them, and probably still have lifting strength to spare on a prey.

For a flexible leather material you could use the stomach hide of a dragon, a lamia, or even a lizard person, depending which exist in a given setting; A series of leather strips from these hides criss-crossed over the stomach could work to provide continues protection as the stomach expands. Of course, having one of these preds alive and under your command would be more ideal, but seeing as how war elephants in our world weren’t always the easiest to control, a rogue wyvern would be catastrophic.

If leather isn’t used, then a series of loose mail sheets hung from the shoulders could accomplish much the same stabbing and shearing protection. Of course, the shoulders would have to be left exposed, as consuming prey as large as a human being would stretch out the throat far more than any fitting armour could handle. As for the helmet, a hide or metal cap covering the crown, back and ears would suffice for most engagements. Maybe a faceplate could be lifted or unbuckled to allow the consumption of prey. However, other types of vore like anal and unbirth might be opted instead to allow continued protection of the face; it’s safe imo to leave your thighs and groin protected only by a skirt of mail than to leave your face and neck unprotected.

I hadn’t thought about gunpowder but yeah, I can certainly see how it could leave riflemen vulnerable, particularly in the early centuries of guns. Seeing as preds can easily take in 3, 4, or more prey at a time, what’s an extra 80kg or so for a thick enough gambeson? Again, perhaps even with that flexible dragon hide leather incorporated into the design, or maybe even bits of scales to function as bullet proofing (at least until the material is stretched, spreading the scales apart and leaving the material weaker). I can definitely see the bayonet charge being replaced with a feeding frenzy where both attacker and defender are devoured. While vore-based tactics would be hard to fully implement in a world of melee combat, I can definitely see them make a comeback following the shift to mostly ranged combat, bows, crossbows, and eventually guns. However, I think advanced rifling and automatic weapons would put a stop to that for good; you can charge a line of riflemen but not a gatling gun.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby Lurk3r » Sat May 14, 2022 6:41 pm

Vore also just isn't practical from an organizational standpoint... you can't have a pike line of people with their mouths open. I imagine that pikes like the sarissa would quickly rule out any ability for them to be used. You try to eat me? Can you swallow twenty feet of sharpened stick first?
You did mention though, as a punitive measure, vore would excel. It's a very unique form of interrogation, torture, etc, and it also makes capturing/killing your enemies during a rout much easier.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby Unfortunate » Sat May 14, 2022 10:49 pm

I've given this a bit of a thought, since it is an interesting topic.
First of all, due to the usage of weapons and armour, you're going to find in most situations that going for a vore themed kill would be far too impractical to work. It's very much a measurement of risk-reward: The results of swallowing a single soldier is pretty much equal to stabbing them, they are incapacitated, though the stabbed target would likely die faster. It would be much more practical to simply go for the same mundane methods of killing we're already familiar with, doubly so in that it's far less risk to the predator. The only case of vore in the heat of battle being actually effective is if there was a specific race/species/predator who had the physical means to minimize their personal risk while performing the manoeuvre, and even then, would it be easier to just whack 'em? Vore as a direct attack in any major battle would likely only be carried out by a very heavily specialised predator species: Physically large, strong natural resistances, impressive reach and grasping speed, ability to swallow and digest incredibly fast. They would need to embody the very spirit of an invincible monster to get away with such a dangerous move. Of course, this is implying that this scenario of yours is a balanced one with no favouritism or fixed results; if you write a story starring a pred in battle eating the entire enemy army, more power to you, it's your damn story...!

Now... The situation where this begins to get more interesting is when we take the nature of war into account: Yes, there is the potential for huge mosh pits of ultra-violence, but there are also smaller scale skirmishes, capturing of assets, ambushes and cloak and dagger plots. Both early and modern strategists will exploit the fuck out of any potential weaknesses they can find, and sometimes they'll even engineer a new weakness for the enemy themselves.
Say for example, you have a certain path the enemy's supply line likes to take? Time for a quick and decisive ambush to leave your foes reeling... You can win a major battle before said major battle even begins if you cripple your foes in the smaller scale battles too.
This is where predators actually become useful, serving more as a tactical element to consider. Say you've an enemy outpost with guards patrolling:
When they get the opportunity to do so, a pred could snag one and abduct them. The enemy may realise they're missing someone, but they may also fail to spot this. A predator could effectively create a form of psychological warfare, putting fear in the hearts of the enemy guards, who know they're disappearing but have no idea why it's happening. When the enemy are sufficiently weakened, the allied force could then swoop in and clean house.
On a smaller scale, predators also have fantastic application in shock and awe tactics: Even if vore is common place in this setting, it's easy for us vorarephiles to forget how terrifying the idea of being eaten actually is to a normal person, so it's safe to say that the mere suggestion that they are going to get eaten may break the nerve of the enemy group you're engaging, especially if they see it happen. A lot of fights in the medieval period were decided when one's side panicked and attempted to run; it was ironically easier to survive in formation, the moment you run you leave yourself vulnerable and forsake your backup, forcing you to stand alone. If one side's morale was broken by the display of predators, the rest would be more easy to round up and eat as they'd be less willing to fight.
Vore would be good for sowing panic, making a show of power to crush the confidence of the enemy, or maybe even just a useful way of removing a piece from the board.

Finally, vore is absolutely the domain of blackguards, ne'er-do-wells and roaming warriors of dubious moral fibre. The display of eating another has shock value and connotations to one's willingness to take everything from someone else, being a display of the very spirit of banditry and pillaging: I wouldn't be surprised if there was a bandit clan who's hierarchy was based around who ate the most people. Eating someone also creates mystery: How are they going to find us if they can't find any trace of the victim? Dreaded bandits who destroy villages, slaughter patrols and eat people would likely hold a fearsome reputation. Likewise an amoral mercenary could create a real feared reputation amongst the general population if they made a name for themselves from eating people. On a local level, vore would have a serious presence, on the scale of a massive warzone, it would lose prominence.
Final point: Vore and assassins would be an interesting combination. Being paid to eat somebody would both kill and dispose of the victim with very little collateral if pulled off by a professional. I could see a predator character as a slayer of kings very easily, though they would need to be incredibly discrete and skilled to pull such things off, and getting out would be harder than getting in. Being a powerful individual with a vore capable underling also provides unique opportunities: Imagine you needed to shake someone down... Yeah, I'll feed you to my pred crony here if you don't cough up...! That would make for one hell of a mighty bodyguard! Though you would have to watch your back...
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby Rejnka » Sun May 15, 2022 12:24 am

I would like to start with a correction. Due to a misreading, I massively overestimated the weight of bomb suits, which are closer to 36+ kg at 80+ pounds.



SnaxiTums wrote:
Rejnka wrote:Medieval combat between armored opponents often ended with a downed opponent being stabbed in a weak spot with a dagger to finish them off. It wouldn't be hard to replace that with eating your oppponent, barring the need for flexible armor materials to enable it. (If animal preds exist, perhaps something made of their leather could go over the stomach area? Like a vornier version of Monster Hunter.) That, and the fact that you'll be stuck with a helmet that seems more like something out of WWI than something that can block a sword - or, at the very least, somethat that leaves your moths and plenty of flexibility open, which the helmets that tended to go with plate armor did not.

I'm actually going to go out on a limb here and say that vore does not bode well for gunpowder-centric warfare. The necessary strength (and, for same-size, flexibility) will make bullets less effective, whereas melee weapons and bows will easily scale up to match stronger flesh and thicker armor. Keep in mind that medieval plate armor was only around 20 kilograms, whereas an average woman is around 62 kilograms. A big vore belly is also a lot less well-balanced than plate armor, and yet rarely seems to encumber its user much. Bomb disposal suits are around 80+ kg, making them miserable to wear into combat, but a pred could easily manage suits like that and melee weapons that can do damage through them, and probably still have lifting strength to spare on a prey.

For a flexible leather material you could use the stomach hide of a dragon, a lamia, or even a lizard person, depending which exist in a given setting; A series of leather strips from these hides criss-crossed over the stomach could work to provide continues protection as the stomach expands. Of course, having one of these preds alive and under your command would be more ideal, but seeing as how war elephants in our world weren’t always the easiest to control, a rogue wyvern would be catastrophic.

If leather isn’t used, then a series of loose mail sheets hung from the shoulders could accomplish much the same stabbing and shearing protection. Of course, the shoulders would have to be left exposed, as consuming prey as large as a human being would stretch out the throat far more than any fitting armour could handle. As for the helmet, a hide or metal cap covering the crown, back and ears would suffice for most engagements. Maybe a faceplate could be lifted or unbuckled to allow the consumption of prey. However, other types of vore like anal and unbirth might be opted instead to allow continued protection of the face; it’s safe imo to leave your thighs and groin protected only by a skirt of mail than to leave your face and neck unprotected.

I hadn’t thought about gunpowder but yeah, I can certainly see how it could leave riflemen vulnerable, particularly in the early centuries of guns. Seeing as preds can easily take in 3, 4, or more prey at a time, what’s an extra 80kg or so for a thick enough gambeson? Again, perhaps even with that flexible dragon hide leather incorporated into the design, or maybe even bits of scales to function as bullet proofing (at least until the material is stretched, spreading the scales apart and leaving the material weaker). I can definitely see the bayonet charge being replaced with a feeding frenzy where both attacker and defender are devoured. While vore-based tactics would be hard to fully implement in a world of melee combat, I can definitely see them make a comeback following the shift to mostly ranged combat, bows, crossbows, and eventually guns. However, I think advanced rifling and automatic weapons would put a stop to that for good; you can charge a line of riflemen but not a gatling gun.

I was under the impression that dragons are not used as same-sized predators, though I do not follow the world of animal or monstrous preds so I could not say for certain.

I already mentioned there potential melee opportunities. I disagree about automatic weapons - They do little damage against tank armor, and a human-sized m1 abrams would "only" weigh 422 kg - and this is much better balanced than a similarly-heavy belly full of 7 women.


Unfortunate wrote:I've given this a bit of a thought, since it is an interesting topic.
First of all, due to the usage of weapons and armour, you're going to find in most situations that going for a vore themed kill would be far too impractical to work. It's very much a measurement of risk-reward: The results of swallowing a single soldier is pretty much equal to stabbing them, they are incapacitated, though the stabbed target would likely die faster. It would be much more practical to simply go for the same mundane methods of killing we're already familiar with, doubly so in that it's far less risk to the predator. The only case of vore in the heat of battle being actually effective is if there was a specific race/species/predator who had the physical means to minimize their personal risk while performing the manoeuvre, and even then, would it be easier to just whack 'em? Vore as a direct attack in any major battle would likely only be carried out by a very heavily specialised predator species: Physically large, strong natural resistances, impressive reach and grasping speed, ability to swallow and digest incredibly fast. They would need to embody the very spirit of an invincible monster to get away with such a dangerous move. Of course, this is implying that this scenario of yours is a balanced one with no favouritism or fixed results; if you write a story starring a pred in battle eating the entire enemy army, more power to you, it's your damn story...!

Now... The situation where this begins to get more interesting is when we take the nature of war into account: Yes, there is the potential for huge mosh pits of ultra-violence, but there are also smaller scale skirmishes, capturing of assets, ambushes and cloak and dagger plots. Both early and modern strategists will exploit the fuck out of any potential weaknesses they can find, and sometimes they'll even engineer a new weakness for the enemy themselves.
Say for example, you have a certain path the enemy's supply line likes to take? Time for a quick and decisive ambush to leave your foes reeling... You can win a major battle before said major battle even begins if you cripple your foes in the smaller scale battles too.
This is where predators actually become useful, serving more as a tactical element to consider. Say you've an enemy outpost with guards patrolling:
When they get the opportunity to do so, a pred could snag one and abduct them. The enemy may realise they're missing someone, but they may also fail to spot this. A predator could effectively create a form of psychological warfare, putting fear in the hearts of the enemy guards, who know they're disappearing but have no idea why it's happening. When the enemy are sufficiently weakened, the allied force could then swoop in and clean house.
On a smaller scale, predators also have fantastic application in shock and awe tactics: Even if vore is common place in this setting, it's easy for us vorarephiles to forget how terrifying the idea of being eaten actually is to a normal person, so it's safe to say that the mere suggestion that they are going to get eaten may break the nerve of the enemy group you're engaging, especially if they see it happen. A lot of fights in the medieval period were decided when one's side panicked and attempted to run; it was ironically easier to survive in formation, the moment you run you leave yourself vulnerable and forsake your backup, forcing you to stand alone. If one side's morale was broken by the display of predators, the rest would be more easy to round up and eat as they'd be less willing to fight.
Vore would be good for sowing panic, making a show of power to crush the confidence of the enemy, or maybe even just a useful way of removing a piece from the board.

Finally, vore is absolutely the domain of blackguards, ne'er-do-wells and roaming warriors of dubious moral fibre. The display of eating another has shock value and connotations to one's willingness to take everything from someone else, being a display of the very spirit of banditry and pillaging: I wouldn't be surprised if there was a bandit clan who's hierarchy was based around who ate the most people. Eating someone also creates mystery: How are they going to find us if they can't find any trace of the victim? Dreaded bandits who destroy villages, slaughter patrols and eat people would likely hold a fearsome reputation. Likewise an amoral mercenary could create a real feared reputation amongst the general population if they made a name for themselves from eating people. On a local level, vore would have a serious presence, on the scale of a massive warzone, it would lose prominence.
Final point: Vore and assassins would be an interesting combination. Being paid to eat somebody would both kill and dispose of the victim with very little collateral if pulled off by a professional. I could see a predator character as a slayer of kings very easily, though they would need to be incredibly discrete and skilled to pull such things off, and getting out would be harder than getting in. Being a powerful individual with a vore capable underling also provides unique opportunities: Imagine you needed to shake someone down... Yeah, I'll feed you to my pred crony here if you don't cough up...! That would make for one hell of a mighty bodyguard! Though you would have to watch your back...


I think we've missed an essential part, which your post brought to my mind.. Logistics. An army runs on its stomach, and it's all the better if you can stuff the other army into your army's stomach instead of overworking the farmers.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby TestAccountPleaseIgnore » Sun May 15, 2022 2:06 am

In modern warfare? Not a chance, unless the predator is legitimately superhuman.

The further back in time you go, the more effective it is; once you hit inter-tribal warfare between hunter-gatherer groups, predators become superweapons: something that you can't meaningfully combat without having another predator on your side.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby SnaxiTums » Sun May 15, 2022 6:33 am

Unfortunate, you raised a good point about vore being used as a terror tactic, but if it’s normalised enough in a setting I think it wouldn’t quite be as shocking as it would be to someone from our world, perhaps being on par with horrific acts like mass blinding or impaling, or the previously mentioned policies of decimation; certainly horrific and terrible to go through, and certainly a way to instil panic and terror, but perhaps not to the extent we would think, particularly in a scenario where both sides engage in it.

I do think you’re right about it being a common tool of bandits and criminals. For the same reasons that vore would be used to great effect against a defeated city, it would also be used against defenceless peasants and merchants in the countryside, all under the nose of the Kingdom/Empire.

Rejnka, I wasn’t necessarily thinking of dragons being used in a same-size context, but in their potential application as weapons of war, much like war elephants, as well as their hides probably being flexible enough to handle the stretching force of a half dozen squirming meals, thus making them good belly armour.

You’re right about the logistic sides of things. Grand military campaigns often involve armies marching on their feet for months or years, having to forage and shake down locals for food. Sure, if you want to conquer a region, going around churning the locals into chyme is political suicide for a number of reasons, but certainly with sieges it would be an inevitability; when the attacking army breaks in, the whole settlement is razed, food taken, civilians butchered and sold into servitude, etc. There’s no reason an army, strained by weeks and months of trying to break the siege, wouldn’t help itself to some of the locals.

Then there’s the case of the defenders. Food runs low or out, things turn desperate, you can do as Vercingetorix did in Alesia and exile the civilian population to the no-man’s-land between you and the enemy, or you could use the civilian population as emergency rations. Such a thing isn’t unheard of either; during the Siege of Suiyang the Tang cannibalised between 20K and 30K civilians.

Another thing that we haven’t considered is magic and how that could assist with handling prey (beyond the already fantastical feat of swallowing enemies whole), although such a thing would instantly make any debate pointless if it can be explained away so easily. Fire spells and potions would shake up unit formation, but such a thing is fairly irrelevant.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby Rejnka » Sun May 15, 2022 1:57 pm

TestAccountPleaseIgnore wrote:In modern warfare? Not a chance, unless the predator is legitimately superhuman.



I believe I was just discussing how preds, by definition, are superhuman unless they only go after tinies.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby ArcaneSigil » Mon May 16, 2022 1:28 am

SnaxiTums wrote:UnfortunateAnother thing that we haven’t considered is magic and how that could assist with handling prey (beyond the already fantastical feat of swallowing enemies whole), although such a thing would instantly make any debate pointless if it can be explained away so easily. Fire spells and potions would shake up unit formation, but such a thing is fairly irrelevant.


I have seen in many a story and other media device, as well as used in my own writings, magic as the single thing that turns the tides of most battles. A mage, if powerful enough, could easily be equal to a thousand soldiers.
Example from a story I'm currently working on: The story in question features Merlin, the mage everyone knows about from the King Arthur mythos. Camelot, and the countryside at large, is attacked by a roving band of mercenaries. Far larger than the typical troop that had been seen in recent years. Numbering in the thousands rather than just a paltry ten or twenty. The Knights simply don't have the man power to fend off such a force and they are quickly being overrun. Merlin steps in and, with a show of force no single "mortal man" could produce, decimates over half of the invading army with a single spell. Merlin the Mage is the single most powerful spell caster in non-anime fantasy history, barring some other characters who were made to be stupid strong mages. A mage of his power could easily devastate an entire countryside and turn it to rubble and ash not suitable for farming or living on.

On the hand of the topic in question, vore itself is not all that practical for warfare unless magic in involved or some other form of extreme size difference such as giants or dragons. Example: Two normal humans, both capable of vore, are facing off in battle. Both of them weigh in at 200 pounds of human flesh (meat, muscle, fat). One of them loses and is subsequently eaten by the other one. That ONE person now weighs in at a staggering 400 pounds, and then some taking other objects into consideration such as clothing or possible weapons. Unless the one who won the match is supernaturally strong, they are now suddenly immobile and unable to move because they suddenly stacked on another two hundred pounds the muscles in their legs just weren't ready for. In a situation where there are multiple combatants, an entire wars worth, the one who just ate someone is now a sitting duck for the opposing side to do away with as they see fit. Could even simply leave them there until the battle was over to deal with at their leisure.

It would come down to fear tactics. Send in your biggest, strongest guy to do battle with their "champion". Your champion wins, eats the losing teams champion whole, and potentially not alive anymore. Now the enemy has something else to think about. If they lose, it is very likely that everyone on your side can, and if so very likely will, eat everyone they defeat in battle. That, in and of itself, would be too much risk to take for any war. Only a psychopath, or someone who has no morals at all, would put their armies through something like that. You win, great. You lose, you never see your family, or anyone else, ever again and spend the rest of your existance fertilizing someone's yard or filling out a septic tank.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby SnaxiTums » Mon May 16, 2022 2:44 am

ArcaneSigil wrote:On the hand of the topic in question, vore itself is not all that practical for warfare unless magic in involved or some other form of extreme size difference such as giants or dragons. Example: Two normal humans, both capable of vore, are facing off in battle. Both of them weigh in at 200 pounds of human flesh (meat, muscle, fat). One of them loses and is subsequently eaten by the other one. That ONE person now weighs in at a staggering 400 pounds, and then some taking other objects into consideration such as clothing or possible weapons. Unless the one who won the match is supernaturally strong, they are now suddenly immobile and unable to move because they suddenly stacked on another two hundred pounds the muscles in their legs just weren't ready for. In a situation where there are multiple combatants, an entire wars worth, the one who just ate someone is now a sitting duck for the opposing side to do away with as they see fit. Could even simply leave them there until the battle was over to deal with at their leisure.

You're right, without some supernatural/magical, or some serious difference in physiology, one combatant devouring another would instantly become a sitting duck. You might be able to train for it somewhat, maybe by carrying large containers of water internally for periods of a time, or even by temporarily devouring teammates during exercise, but that's a lot of effort for something clearly not suited for much more than duels or small scale group combat.

ArcaneSigil wrote:It would come down to fear tactics. Send in your biggest, strongest guy to do battle with their "champion". Your champion wins, eats the losing teams champion whole, and potentially not alive anymore. Now the enemy has something else to think about. If they lose, it is very likely that everyone on your side can, and if so very likely will, eat everyone they defeat in battle. That, in and of itself, would be too much risk to take for any war. Only a psychopath, or someone who has no morals at all, would put their armies through something like that. You win, great. You lose, you never see your family, or anyone else, ever again and spend the rest of your existance fertilizing someone's yard or filling out a septic tank.

Having a champion or two from each side engage in a one-on-one duel like that would be a perfect use of vore in the context of warfare. If I remember correctly, it was a common practice at one stage during the Bronze Age to have the biggest, toughest guy from either army duke it out, and that would decide the battle. If there's anything that'd make an army run for the hills, it'd probably be seeing their commander get swallowed whole.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby SnaxiTums » Mon May 16, 2022 3:02 am

A lot of the problems with using vore as a warfare tactic come down to weapons and, to a lesser extent, armour. However, such problems probably wouldn't exist for an aquatic race such as mermaids; no metalurgy, no problem. Also, water allows attacking from literally all directions. This would probably make naval combat especially dangerous in this world, as if you so much as fall off your trimarine/longship/caravel, you'll be vulnerable to attacks from creatures like mermaids or giant half-whales (merwhales?).
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby Rejnka » Mon May 16, 2022 12:46 pm

ArcaneSigil wrote:
SnaxiTums wrote:UnfortunateAnother thing that we haven’t considered is magic and how that could assist with handling prey (beyond the already fantastical feat of swallowing enemies whole), although such a thing would instantly make any debate pointless if it can be explained away so easily. Fire spells and potions would shake up unit formation, but such a thing is fairly irrelevant.


I have seen in many a story and other media device, as well as used in my own writings, magic as the single thing that turns the tides of most battles. A mage, if powerful enough, could easily be equal to a thousand soldiers.
Example from a story I'm currently working on: The story in question features Merlin, the mage everyone knows about from the King Arthur mythos. Camelot, and the countryside at large, is attacked by a roving band of mercenaries. Far larger than the typical troop that had been seen in recent years. Numbering in the thousands rather than just a paltry ten or twenty. The Knights simply don't have the man power to fend off such a force and they are quickly being overrun. Merlin steps in and, with a show of force no single "mortal man" could produce, decimates over half of the invading army with a single spell. Merlin the Mage is the single most powerful spell caster in non-anime fantasy history, barring some other characters who were made to be stupid strong mages. A mage of his power could easily devastate an entire countryside and turn it to rubble and ash not suitable for farming or living on.


Funny that. You aren't familiar with the Welsh legends, I take it? The Knights of the Round Table were, for all intents and purposes, a superhero team on the level of the Argonauts. A few thousand of mere mercenaries? Literally nothing to them. The Cath Palug slew 180 warriors in one battle, and it was struck down by Sir Kay. Sir Kay can grow giant and emit massive amounts of heat, sure, but he's also the guy you have to beat in order to join the Round Table in the first place, so the other knights are even stronger than him. Merlin is a valuable member of King Arthur's court, yes, but that's because of his role as a mentor and advisor - he would get creamed by Round Table-level enemies.

Before you write a story about Arthurian myth, remember: King Arthur once slew a dragon naked, armed only with a club. Why? Just to prove that he can.

The idea of "legendary heroes are way more valuable than mages" is a reoccuring theme in myth. Medea, who slew a giant with literally just a nasty look, wasn't the strongest Argonaut - she was stuck on the same boat as Achilles and, on rare occasions, Heracles. Even Odin, the model for the traditional "beard and wizard hat" look, for his godly might and infinite wisdom, was a pipsqueak compared to his son Thor.



Also, Merlin is as much an anime mage as a fantasy one, in that he's appeared in both but he originates from Welsh mythology.
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby JustCurious1123 » Thu May 19, 2022 4:44 pm

SnaxiTums wrote:Size would be particularly important, particularly when facing off against another rival band, as the bigger you are the less you’re bogged down by prey; the last thing you want is to immobilise yourself eating 5 humans only to be gobbled up by a giant 3 times your size.


Finaly someone here is clever enough to actually adress this. Everytime I see some art about same-size vore that ended up with the pred being morbidly obese, I can only think: "Concratulations, you just made yourself an easy target."
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Re: Application of Vore in Warfare

Postby Rejnka » Fri May 20, 2022 1:25 am

JustCurious1123 wrote:
SnaxiTums wrote:Size would be particularly important, particularly when facing off against another rival band, as the bigger you are the less you’re bogged down by prey; the last thing you want is to immobilise yourself eating 5 humans only to be gobbled up by a giant 3 times your size.


Finaly someone here is clever enough to actually adress this. Everytime I see some art about same-size vore that ended up with the pred being morbidly obese, I can only think: "Concratulations, you just made yourself an easy target."

A Giant 3 times your size is rookie humbers. If you can't manage the strength of 27 normal humans, why are you even a war predator?
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