Comments by IvesBentonEaton Page 1 of 1 • 1

Dick
By Ives Benton Eaton
This is the story of a wizard and an unfortunate encounter with a succubus.
Now, aside from the soul-draining aspect of their kisses—or other more intimate “embraces”—most males would regard an encounter with a succubus to be at least interesting, if not good.
Not so for our wizard, who went by the cumbersome name of Erhain Aragard Dystellenol. Erhain was a lore-master in the Magnus Bibliotheca of the Ordo Ars Magica—or, in plain language,

Dick

Uploaded: 2 months ago

Owner: IvesBentonEaton

IvesBentonEaton - 1 month ago

Ah aims ta please. Sometimes Ah even hits.

IvesBentonEaton - 2 months ago

I didn't mention all the details. I wrote that Dxyxallyxikspt had his own instructions but didn't explicitly state whose instructions they were. One could infer that those instructions came by way of Sanselibera, who decided to get the upper hand on her rival by having her promise a payment that she wouldn't be able to deliver.

IvesBentonEaton - 2 months ago

Ha. That's not "old AF". I played original edition back in junior high school. I skipped AD&D 1st Edition but have all the 2nd Edition stuff. We upgraded to 3 adn 3.5 because it looked like a serious effort to fix long-standing problems in earlier editions. When 4E came out, our group didn't like the direction that the game was taking and declined to upgrade. After 5E came out, a few of us looked over the SRD and agreed that it was better than 4E but it wasn't worth the hassle of buying new books and converting all our version 3.5 stuff to 5. Since Āen is based on a setting I designed back in 3.5 days, all the stuff in my stories uses that as a framework. See "Magic of Āen" elsewhere in the gallery for much of the customized version 3.5 spells and magic items mentioned in this gallery.

IvesBentonEaton - 11 months ago

Green snake approves of this message.

Chains Stronger Than Steel
By Maomix and Ives Benton Eaton
Sometimes you get the dragon, and sometimes the dragon gets you.
—Gerehardt Grenthaler, dragon hunter, several months before a dragon got him
It was a good day for dragon slaying.
A single rider made her way across the ford in the river, then examined the green and gently rolling plains surrounding the low limestone cliff-face exposed by centuries of erosion by that same river. The spring had brought out the characteristic blue cor

Chains Stronger Than Steel

Uploaded: 11 months ago

Owner: IvesBentonEaton

IvesBentonEaton - 11 months ago

I did. I'm good at dragons. See half the other stories in my gallery: "The Dragon", "The Sixth Path", "Duel of Drakes", "A Study of Dragons", "A Fairly Fair Ferry Fare", and now this. Didn't start out thinking that I'd be doing so many dragon stories, it just sort of ended up that way…

IvesBentonEaton - 11 months ago

Darn. We were going for torturous. :P

But seriously (as such things ever get), thanks.

Eventful Night On The Town

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: skullcrusheramk

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Technically, this is second-person, not first-person. First person would be the writer's perspective, not the reader's.

Gentle enough? :P

Another Fine Mess
By Skitten and Ives Benton Eaton
Hessana wished nature wasn’t so messy.
She had been traveling for weeks from the Heartwood, the mystical center of the Deepwold, now far to the northeast. She liked it there; it would be a rare sierfāen who did not. She certainly liked it better than where she was now.
She had resented being sent on this mission. She didn’t see why she had to be the one to leave the Heartwood. There, nature was—well, orderly. The creatures wer

Another Fine Mess

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: IvesBentonEaton

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Technically, it isn't reformation, which is the equivalent in this setting of a [i]true resurrection[/i] spell. It is tagged that way because if [i]I[/i] didn't, everyone else would.

Transformation is the more accurate tag: what the [i]kwurdāin[/i] spell does is actually a contingent defensive transformation. It defends against the digestion in the stomach as long as it can, then triggers a temporary transmutation of the subject of that spell into a substance that can safely pass through the creature's bowels: chyme. Since the subject never actually dies, there is no need for an expensive reformation (resurrection) spell.

Oh, dear. Someone left me set to "nerd". Let me start again…

Hi! I'm glad you liked the story. Almost all the other stories in my gallery (except the Commissions) make use of that spell. (I really like that spell.) So you may find other stories you enjoy even more here.

Magic of Āen
This is a Dungeons and Dragons® version 3.5 list of spells and magic items introduced in Āen. Why version 3.5 and not version 5? Why D&D at all?
When I first made the setting, it was a for story I wrote entirely for myself. It started with a cavern and a nearby village, then a city, then another town and a farming community, then the city that would eventually become Spellkeep, the seat of the Order of Magical Art, that famous (or notorious) city of wizards. I used a D&

The Magic of Āen

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: IvesBentonEaton

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Well, I strip out the fetish part and run it as an actual D&D campaign.

Most work is wasted anyway; what is one more?

In this case, the world-building sprang from the fetish work; the former would not have existed without the latter.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

I see what you did there…

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

I don't see why not. Or pump it out in some method if not. Of course, it might just be easier to use [i]quick potion[/i] from the [i]Spell Compendium[/i] in such cases; [i]lactation[/i] was somewhat based on it.

The Gift Horse
By Ives Benton Eaton
[Commission for Leshana]
It was Leshana’s turn to clean Bastard’s stall.
That wasn’t the Clydesdale stallion’s actual name; the komodo dragon lord’s prized steed, a gift from the regional commander himself, had a name in the Herps’ own tongue, but it was too full of consonants and sibilants for her to pronounce. Like all the other fox slaves who worked their master’s stables, she just called him Bastard.
Bastard was a

The Gift Horse

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: IvesBentonEaton

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Well, when one of the founders of the Portal is asking for a story, you sort of write what they want. It's a commission, after all. Anyway, I just posted a RP the day before over six times longer than this story titled "Comes the Storm". Still working on story #7 of [i]Tales of a Visceral Voyager[/i], "Spellkeep".

Science 4

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: Modern45

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

I haven't checked the math, but it seems about right.

With a human rate of digestion, a lot of it would be wasted, of course. Snakes manage it by taking longer and having a digestive system that can adapt to a sudden large meal faster.

(If she tried to digest a meal that large without chewing in the same amount of time, the biological energy needed to digest something that large that fast would probably boil her abdomen, if not flash-fry it, but that's the risk you assume when you do same-size vore.) :P

Even so, snakes occasionally die when they swallow a meal too large for them to digest fast enough: dead bodies rot over time, and if it rots before the snake can digest it, the toxins and gas produced is generally fatal to the snake.

Science is fun! :D

Can't let you starve

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: BTS

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

It's a cute scenario. For later reference, snakes can go for weeks or even months without eating. Some have been known to go as long as a year. Two days is nothing; the snake won't even notice.

Marcy in a pickle

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: Ekohime

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

While there is an old Dragon magazine article with a spell to awaken (bring to sentience) an ooze, and there are templates to raise the Intelligence to 3, the very bare minimum for sapience, gelatinous cubes, like all regular ooze creatures, are mindless—no Intelligence score at all.

Also, gelatinous cubes are vulnerable to pretty much any physical attack, and their attacks are pretty weaksauce. A simple 2nd-level [i]resist elements[/i] spell can stop the acid. But the Fortitude save on their paralysis attack is moderate, and right off the charts for a max-HD cube.

Man, you guys are makin' me wear my D&D nerd hat a LOT… :P

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Anyone can roll a 1 on a Fortitude save… >:D

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

<Enable D&D Nerd Mode>
Actually, at least in D&D version 3.5, they are only Challenge Rating 3.

Advance them to maximum hit dice and they become…rather more formidable.

Adding a planar template (fiendish, axiomatic, anarchic) makes them even nastier.
<End D&D Nerd Mode>

Marcy in a pickle, again.

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: Ekohime

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Heh. Well, one doesn't have to learn it all in one sitting, or all of it ever, although it's nice if the game master does. At least, D&D only has you do stuff that you can do on a four-function calculator. I recall one game, [i]Ringworld[/i], whose authors decided that people wanted a game that required one to do square roots in the middle of combat. That might qualify for unnecessarily complicated…

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

It's the number of skill points spent to improve the skill plus the appropriate attribute score modifier (for spot, that is Wisdom) plus any racial modifiers (for example, elves get +2 on Spot and Listen scores), plus any modifiers for magic and miscellaneous stuff.

An attribute score is Strength, Constitution, Dexterity (the physical attributes), Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma (the mental attributes; Charisma is regarded more as "force of personality" more than physical beauty).

A human typically rolls three six-sided dice, totaled, for each of these. The modifier is equal to the attribute divided by two rounded down minus five, so if one has a Wisdom of 13 (a bit above average), the modifier (added to Spot and Listen and other similar skill scores) is 13 / 2 = 6.5, rounded down to 6, minus 5 for a Wisdom modifier of +1.

There's a few other things to be said about it, but I've already gone on [b][i]way[/i][/b] too much about this in a venue completely inappropriate to it. :D

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Sorry for making your comment section a D&D tutorial. On the plus side, it all counts as comments for your art, so…yay? :P

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Well, the following sentence sort of explains it, but if you really want to know:

DC is Difficulty Class. A Spot check is a roll on a 20-sided die with a character's Spot score added to it. If this sum is equal to or greater than the DC in question (15), then the character spotted the creature or object in question: in this case, a transparent gelatinous cube hungrily bearing down on the adventurer(s). >:D

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Well, I agree, except that the gelatinous cube (and the black pudding, for that matter) originated with D&D, so it [i]is[/i] rather the canon source for those critters.

Now, in my setting, I use a modified and renamed version of the gelatinous cube simply named the ingester. They don't necessarily conform to a cube shape if they are not squeezing down a 10' by 10' corridor; they are a gelatin that weighs tons, so how could they? Also, unlike the cubes, ingesters precipitate indigestible items—otherwise, the DC 15 Spot check to see them is silly. "Hey, guys, there's an empty suit of chainmail floating toward us. Whaddaya tbink it is?" :P

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

For gelatinous cubes, there are no specific rules for loss of clothing or armor, so it is a game master's (or artist's or writer's) call.

For black puddings, there is a Reflex save for armor worn by prey they are constricting, and it's a pretty nasty one. Of course, black puddings are one of the nastier oozes.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

<Enable D&D Nerd Mode>
Technically, no. Gelatinous cubes secrete an anesthetizing slime that paralyzes their prey. She won't feel a thing, unless she has a [i]freedom of movement[/i] spell running, in which case she can probably just pull herself free. A basic cube is not very strong.

Also, since cubes can only digest organic materials, I would guess that she was not wearing metal armor.
<End D&D Nerd Mode>

A Study of Dragons
By Ives Benton Eaton
Given that dragons may have been magically constructed in the distant past for the titanic wars whose histories are now but dim echoes, it only makes sense that they would be made as terrible as possible. Such creatures would naturally be made to regard humans as food, for how else could such huge beasts be kept fed in the field but on the bodies of foes?
—Felciti Faranal, loremaster, “A Study of Dragons”
It was the last dawn she’d

A Study of Dragons

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: IvesBentonEaton

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Gee, why don't I get more comments like these on my other stories? :P

(Just in case someone missed the :P, I'm kidding.)

You're not the first to ask for a sequel. I have quite a few stories ahead of it and I have to think of some new plot involving them.

But who knows?

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Thanks. I wrote it in rather a hurry, so it may still have bugs. But I am fairly pleased with it despite that.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Don't miss the other stories; they are all in the same setting.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

No worries. I've likely had a head start on you, there. :P

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

No, no. You’re fine. You’re not being offensive, I’m just trying to understand how your collars and the [i]kwurdāin[/i]-enchanted torques of Āen compare and contrast.

They do have a distinct difference. Yours trigger a reformation after digestion and disposal; the [i]kwurdāin[/i] spell transforms [i]before[/i] digestion can take place, and only [i]simulates[/i] digestion. The prey never actually dies, and the grotesque parts are over much faster in a blast of utter ecstasy as the spell triggers the transformation. So even though my stories have the reformation tag, it isn’t really reformation: it’s just dismissing the transmutation spell, which is a lot less hassle and expense in a D&D-based setting.

Still, I use the reformation tag on these stories because (a) if I didn’t, some random reader would, and with justification, because (b) it would be a distinction without a difference to most people anyway. This distinction is important from a plot standpoint, though: with a transformation, the prey is alive and gets to experience more than the first 20% of the trip through the gastrointestinal tract (otherwise, they die in the stomach) and, most importantly, they get to have thoughts and feelings the whole way, so they are not just inert dung, but [b]characters[/b]. And with the [i]share mind[/i] spell, they can continue to interact with their prey even after the [i]kwurdāin[/i] spell triggers, and that means dialog! Woo! It also means predator and prey can share perspectives, which is an element of empathy and character development.

OK, the attendants are sneaking up on me with nets and 2-by-4s now, so I must run. Hope you enjoyed your drink from the firehose! :D

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Wait, what? These "collars"—torques, actually—are distinct magical jewelry with a minimum of three spells; one of these spells, [i]kwurdāin[/], is a unique design. The one in the story had three additional spells.

"Prey collar" is a sort of collective colloquialism for these torques, so I'm guessing you are simply talking about collars used to mark prey and that yours don't have the magical properties of the ones used in my stories, which I only started posting since last November.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

I've found that reuploads of a story aren't visible until I log out or close the browser instance and log back in, just refreshing the browser page doesn't work.

As for the geese, little does anyone know, but they have a secret society, and plans for that world…and this one. >.> :D

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Perhaps I will, but I don't want to write too many more adjunct stories before I've finished Zōēā's story arc in [i]Tales of a Visceral Voyager[/i], and there are at least six more of hers planned. The reason for that is that her adventures are what got the "prey collars" mentioned in the story released to the Āen at large; she wore the original one. So her actions have a profound effect on every other vore story set on Āen, and if I decide on some major thing in one of her stories, there could be ripple effects on every other story set in Āen. Zōēā is my MIC (Most Important Character).

The idea for this one hit me out of the blue so I whomped it up in something less than a week. I had to make like four re-uploads of it just tonight as I discovered more glitches or changes I thought of to improve the story; I usually wait a few weeks after finishing a story before posting it to catch these in later read-throughs, so this story is still rough around the edges.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Ummm…thank you. Did you, perchance, see the [i]other[/i] folder in my gallery labeled [i]Tales of a Visceral Voyager[/i]? The one with the six stories set in the same world, with at least six more to come?

If not, you have a lot of happy reading ahead of you yet; Zōēā's stories [i]started[/i] the Āen setting vore stories.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Hmmm. Already had to fix a few glitches, then I thought of another minor plot point that better explained the presence of the torque. Reuploaded it.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Hey, what happens in Spellkeep…can warp the fabric of space and time.

I mean…
What happens in Spellkeep…stays in Spellkeep only because of the interdimensional interdiction spells.

I mean…

CH 15 Welcome Home

Part 1



Deep in

the

forsaken jungle a man was running. He didn’t know

why, but he

new

that stopping was out of the question

. He leaped over a large pit noticing the hungry crocodi

Ch 15 Welcome Home Part 1

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: tgawsome

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

You may want to check your margin settings as well. You seem to be one of the posters whose margins are set so wide that one has to scroll left and right to read your posts directly on Eka's.

I have not had this problem using OpenOffice files saved to Word 97/2000/XP format; they have always uploaded to my gallery perfectly.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Odd. Doesn't your word processor support autosave?

Talk to the Animals
By Ives Benton Eaton
“Here, leezard, leezard, leezard…”
—Gidget the chihuahua, voiced by Carlos Alazraqui
“Come on, Būshān. Try again.”
Būshān was Zōēā’s young emerald green python, now just over ten feet long. This would normally not be a good pet for a young adult human or even a young adult wild elf, such as Zōēā was, but Būshān was not simply a pet—she was the animal companion of a veldami, a green-witch, a wi

Talk to the Animals

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: IvesBentonEaton

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Technically speaking, within the setting, the spell's school is transmutation, and limited to the druid and assassin classes. I was wrong about the source, though: it comes from the [i]Complete Scoundrel[/i], not the [i]Spell Compendium[/i]. My bad.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Of course. I'm civilized. All my camel brethren tell me that this is true for at least three data points. :P

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Oh, and the staircase spell is [i]smoke stairs[/i] from the [i]Spell Compendium[/i].

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Thank you for your comments. You have a point about the jewels; there is no need for Mastersten to mention them prior to the recovery of the dagger. As for the exposition, well, pedantry is an occupational hazard of wizardry. Also, don't overlook the tendency of males to talk too much around attractive females. Even wizards can be rather stupid that way.

I claim no expertise in writing love scenes. One maxim of writing is to "write what you know". In that respect, all of my knowledge is at second remove (or further). Those are always difficult scenes for me to write, but I do not doubt for one moment that if I condensed them I'd get complaints about that, too.

Magical girl Ekohime.

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: Ekohime

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

OK, this one pegged the cuteness meter. It doesn't quite bend the needle, but close.

The Sixth Path
By Ives Benton Eaton
I run my prey to exhaustion whenever I can. Their meat is so much more tender then; their fear and despair the most delightful of seasonings.
—Gratelankularugovistafiskor, dragon of the Path of the Tooth
Being hunted by a dragon can be stressful.
Particularly when one has stolen from that dragon. Nothing quite angers a dragon so much as that.
Zōēā, a wild elf of the Shāhūnā (known to humans as the Boa Tribe), and Langōval, a sylvan elf of the nort

The Sixth Path

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: IvesBentonEaton

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Well, fantasy worlds in vore fiction are a dozen for a silver, and elves in fantasy worlds are even cheaper by the dozen, so that is no surprise. Even druids in vore fiction are not unheard of, but all of the ramifications of a D&D 3.5 druid—not so much. Some of their class abilities add certain touches that will become evident in later stories about Zōēā.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Sometimes I do. This is the fifth of at least a dozen stories. The first one spent about a paragraph and a half on just the disposal, and while I didn't spend much text on her sitting there in a mound, Zōēā didn't reform until the kwurdāin spell expired because she didn't know it was a spell, and so she didn't know it could be dismissed.

In the cases of stories two and four, she was eaten by a creature much larger than she. In D&D 3.5 terms, the tyrannosaur and Aragandafer were Gargantuan sized creatures, and so she took up comparatively less room in their rectums: one grunt and she was out. In story four, she had to reform before she sank into the cesspool.

As for this story: most of what Gongolorithan passed was undigested tapeworm, and I felt it did not serve the story to dwell upon that.

And that's the primary thing: the needs of the story come first. If the story events dictate a quicker description to avoid breaking the flow, then that's what it will get.

Fear not, though. I think that you will find that story #10, in particular, will address your desires in spades, and it is already written. Of course, I still have to finish writing story #7, #8, and #9, and those may affect #10, which is why I release them in order. (#6 is complete except for the last line edits and #7 is about half-written and may introduce any number of concepts that will alter events and writing in the later stories. Magic can do that, particularly if one is researching new spells. #8 and #9 only have synopsis paragraphs to mark their places.)

A-a-and I've written way too much again. I'm out.

Food Chained
By Ives Benton Eaton
(Author’s note: Ladahūnā, the language of elves in this world—called “Āen” by them—uses separate letters for long and short vowels. To aid pronunciation in Ladahūnā words translated to English, macrons have been placed above long vowels, so “Zōēā” is pronounced “ZOH-ee-yay”. The “th” digraph has a cedilla mark below the “t” if it is a “voiced th”, as in the word &ld

Food Chained

Uploaded: 1 year ago

Owner: IvesBentonEaton

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Sorry for the late reply.

I am fully aware of the disparity between the amount of fecal matter produced in the story compared to what actually emerges from reptiles. While I have never raised any, I have researched the beasties more than casually. But vore has never been about science, but fantasy, which is why I opted for a fantasy setting to tell my stories.

What happened was not actual digestion and reformation; it was the triggering and later termination of contingent defensive magic. The kwurdāin spell was designed, basically, to absorb the damage done by the chemical (or, in the case of some predators, thermal) and kinetic action of a predator's stomach, and when it could do so no longer, trigger a second phase, a defensive transmutation that simulated digestion. Obviously the biological energy needed to digest almost a hundred pounds of elf girl down to chyme in seconds would have cause an exothermic reaction that would have boiled Ameldēān from the inside out.

This spell also ensures that the predator's gastrointestinal tract cannot extract so much that the swallowed creature doesn't have enough left to reconstitute, but since it does the primary stage of "digestion" for the predator, it is still a net gain for it; a snake spends perhaps a third of the energy it gains from its prey just digesting it.

This means that there is much more to excrete, of course, but the spell helps there, too: it ensures a regular (if rather large) single bowel movement, since the spell would be a failure if the recipient was not disposed of all at once instead of several piles scattered over the landscape at different times: reconstitution from dismissing the spell (or it expiring naturally) would kill the recipient. Likewise, the spell prevents diarrhea or constipation that might otherwise degrade the performance of the spell.

Once out, the spell recipient can dismiss the spell, resume her normal form, and escape. She'll be ravenously hungry and weakened by what was taken from her body, but alive. Most who use this spell make sure to have access to restorative magic to use afterward.

Certainly, the spell is not perfect—but then, what is? But for its specialized purpose, it gets the job done.

I am nothing if not detail-oriented.

I certainly agree with you about "bones in scat". Even the human digestive system can deal with bones. Those it can't generally become very painful and possibly fatal bowel blockages. No bones in scat, please.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Naturally, a knowledge of D&D isn't requires to enjoy the stories. I use it as a framework for Āen because Āen started as a D&D setting I made over the past few years and was readily available, and D&D has always been very vore- and kink-friendly anyway; it only needed a few extra spells to round things out. The inspiration for Zōēā is a D&D character I am still playing in a (non-vore) D&D game.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

You…resisted trying to get off? Blast! You made your Will save! :P

Seriously, though, as stated in the afterword, there should be some familiarity, as the [i]Shāhūnā[/i] (People of the Boa Snake) are basically Dungeons and Dragons® (version 3.5) wild elves, and simple extrapolation of how a very long-lived but primitive culture with access to working magic might develop.

Anyway, thanks for the comment, and I hope you enjoy the rest of Zōēā’s stories—the other five here and numbers 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, and at least 12, if I can ever get #7 finished.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

As noted in the updated description of this story, I have made certain edits to reflect your comment and to correct a more annoying error I discovered while working on that, as well as rewriting some ambiguous dialog. Thanks again.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Error noted and the errant "a" has been terminated with extreme prejudice in the master file, and it has been replaced here. Thanks.

The reason Zōēā's father got mentioned was so that it wouldn't seem like he was getting completely left out of the most important event in her life until that time. Still, what she underwent is something between veldami; Gelorn would not be initiated into the mystery. But yeah, the sentence is clunky. I'll see what I can do about it.

Zōēā's reticence about her experience is partly explained in the text of the story, but if you think about it, she probably isn't going to open up about it just then. After all, I doubt that any veldami is going to tell her daughter about "the birds and the bees (and the snakes)" by saying something like, "Now, daughter mine, when you are being devoured by a snake, you might find yourself becoming sexually excited…" It's not the sort of thing that one runs and tells one's mother right away, even one as open-minded as Yessanth.

Also, I felt that going into a deep discussion between the two of them on that aspect of Zōēā's experience would tend to hinder the progress of the story and become repetitive. It's worth noting that by story 3, "Homecoming", this reticence has been overcome; it is not a secret between them any longer, and the text of that story suggests this.

Your points have merit, though, and I thank you for the comment.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Thanks. Some of my better stories come from characters I have played in RPGs, since I invest a lot of time in developing them. That never means that these stories are about any of the adventures that those characters have in games. I take the character concept and drop it into a setting over which I have complete control—which is never an RPG, even if I am the game master. (That's not how RPGs are supposed to work.)

I best leave it at that before you start screaming, "TMI! TMI!" You can wander through my growing blog here if you want to smell my brain farts. :P

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Odd. I thought I was, too. No worries, though. Anyway, I hope to be posting more of Zōēā's adventures when I'm satisfied that I've done as much as I can on them to defeat the Law of Cybernetic Etymology ("There's always another bug").

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Actually, I'm familiar enough with Sturgeon's Law to know that what people call Sturgeon's Law is actually not. Yes, Theodore Sturgeon said it, but some other statement is actually his Law, so the more famous statement is referred to by purists as Sturgeon's Commentary or something. But I make the same mistake, too.

I also have a corollary to Sturgeon's Not-Actually-His-Law: From crud can grow flowers. When someone reads the crud and decides, "I can do better", then goes out and proves it, then crud has served a purpose. So this makes me a bit less judgmental.

Just a bit.

Thanks for the comment. There are about a dozen stories in this line planned, half of which are done except for checking for continuity errors (and the inevitable other typos and glitches). Two are half-written, two have only a working title and a paragraph of synopsis, another one is done but it is further in the timeline so it won't be released until I'm sure some detail in unfinished previous stories won't conflict.

IvesBentonEaton - 1 year ago

Actually, I'm familiar enough with Sturgeon's Law to know that what people call Sturgeon's Law is actually not. Yes, Theodore Sturgeon said it, but some other statement is actually his Law, so the more famous statement is usually referred to purists as Sturgeon's Commentary or something. But I make the same mistake, too.

I also have a corollary to Sturgeon's Not-Actually-His-Law: From crud can grow flowers. When someone reads the and decides, "T can do better", then goes out and proves it, then crud has served a purpose. So this makes me a bit less judgmental.

Just a bit.

Thanks for the comment. There are about a dozen stories in this line planned, half of which are done except for checking for continuity errors (and the inevitable typos and glitches). Two are half-written, two have only a working title and a paragraph of synopsis, another one is done but it is further in the timeline so it won't be released until I'm sure some detail in unfinished previous stories won't conflict.